Saturday, September 21, 2013

All That Glitters Is Not Gold: Review of Cecilia T. Capers' To Whom Much Is Given

[Click cover to order To Whom Much Is Given today!]

Success has a price and sometimes loved-ones become collateral damage. Avery Benjamin is a beautiful, 30-something, talented New York City corporate attorney of West Indian and African American heritage. A dynamic multicultural mosaic of women friends augments her life. Avery loves Antonio Dawson, a professional football player whose family is part of Atlanta’s influential African American elite. Yet, she longs for the days when she pursued big, passionate dreams. Dean Everard Swithin, a British aristocrat and Avery’s former lover from her law school days, re-enters her life making her a professional offer she cannot refuse. That is when Avery’s drama begins. Scandal and deception change her heart and her perception. Ultimately, Avery must take steps to confront her past, mend her wounds, and fulfill her destiny. “To Whom Much Is Given” is a contemporary fictional story for any person who realizes: The Best Is Yet To Come.

CLG Review of  To Whom Much Is Given

4 (out of 5) lattes

All That Glitters Is Not Gold

Sometimes, even when things appear perfect and wonderful, they are the exact opposite. In Cecilia Capers' debut novel, To Whom Much Is Given, we meet Avery Benjamin, a 30-something with the world at her feet. She's beautiful, she's talented, she has wonderful friends, and she has a wonderful man in Antonio Dawson, a professional football player. Life is good. Very good. Except for that yearning Avery has, a yearning for fulfillment of dreams tucked away. When a former lover re-enters her world, drama ensues, and Avery must trudge through her past to claim her dreams. I enjoyed Capers' first literary effort. There are several reasons for this. It was refreshing to read about upwardly mobile people of color. For me, that adds to the diversity of African-American characters in stories, but it also does something great for the story: it shows that no economic bracket can escape drama, conflict, and issues. Capers also does a good job in developing the conflict in the story, of which there is plenty. The story did read slow in some places where we get a lot of back story about characters, but overall, Capers shows that she is capable of spinning of good story, and I look forward to seeing what she spins next.

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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